7 Reasons Why Getting a Dog is not a Good Idea During College

 

20160619_110114College is hard as is. But to add a dog, into the mix… what could I have possibly been thinking?! Take it from me; being a college student and caring for my dog, Lilo, is too much! Here are 7 reasons proving why college and dogs just do not mix.

No more sleeping in.

Every single morning, I swear, Lilo wakes me up before 8 o’ clock, which is just soooo early. Even worse, she wakes me up by nudging herself in between my pillow and my head and proceeds to lick my face. Man, puppy kisses are so annoying.

screenshot_20160625-185129

Dogs require a ton of money to care for.

A dog is a HUGE money guzzler. I have to spend a whopping $45 a month on her for food, toys, and other necessities. I have to cancel my monthly nail appointment just to afford that!

screenshot_20161002-163958

 

Companionship

Who would want someone that is there for you no matter what, who listens to every problem you have at any time of the day, who loves you through everything, no if’s, and’s, or but’s? That’s right, No one. Best friends are overrated!

curuml0uaaey5fg

 

They take up so much of your time.

Dogs are really demanding. They require so much up-keep: a few walks around the block, trips to the dog park… It’s just too much. I don’t have time to balance school and my social life AND a dog. Just to make things worse, I can’t bring my dog with me anywhere ! Nowadays, no establishments are dog-friendly and all my friends just hate when I bring an adorable dog with me when we hang out. UGH.

img_20151126_115247_01

 

Dogs don’t make you that happy.

Dogs are just kind of there. You don’t get emotionally attached to them at all. They don’t become the center of your world nor do they make you question how you survived before they entered your life. And there are zero scientific findings on the life-long positive effects of owning a dog… absolutely none.

hz23dv

You become more responsible.

It drives me CRAZY that I actually had to learn how to be responsible when adopted Lilo. Why couldn’t I have just learned responsibility once I was out of college… in the real world… with no money and no plans?! That would have been way better than learning a valuable life lesson in college. I would much prefer falling flat on my face due to my irresponsibility in a few years!

screenshot_2015-11-03-15-06-16

Dogs just aren’t cute.

ESPECIALLY puppies. Their fur isn’t even that fluffy and soft and those puppy dog eyes never tug at my heart strings. None of it’s cute! Not even when you try and get your dog to howl but they just can’t so it sounds like this…

 

 

By Kailey Norman

Alaskan Malamutes for Dummies

* Be advised this is one person’s opinion and experience of owning an Alaskan Malamute… oh that’s kind of what a blog is.

Like owning a pet of any kind, Alaskan Malamutes are a huge responsibility.  You have to devote a part of every day to exercising, playing with, training, etc.

I got my Malamute, Simba, when he was about 10 weeks old, during winter break.  He’s now 11 months. Was it a smart idea to get a puppy while still in college? Probably not. None the less, I don’t regret my choice. He has changed my life for the better.20160131_141429

When I decided to get a malamute, I did a lot of research on the basics of the breed’s characteristics, personalities and training. Was I prepared to raise a malamute? Hell no.

I now had this little fluff ball in my life who was energetic and adorable. I was clueless to how to raise a dog, even with all of my research. I didn’t know what kind of shots he needed and for how long. It was one of those times when you call your mother to ask how to do your laundry. I did call my mother, got the vet’s number that we’ve used for ages and looked online about puppy kindergarten. I found out to participate in puppy kindergarten he had to have his first set of shots. Simba ended up going it Sit Happens for puppy kindergarten an hour a week. This is crucial for puppies to socialize with other dogs while they are under 5 months.

I also didn’t know how much to feed him, especially when he was rapidly growing until 7 or 8 months.  He gained about 10-12 pounds every 3 weeks when he visited the vet.  Therefore his food amount increased often.  I mainly followed the directions on the back of the food bag regarding how much to feed him.  While observing if he finished all his food, and if he was getting a little too skinny or fat. It was actually very hard to tell when they are still in the growing phase. When he was young I fed him 3 times a day because it was better for his digestive system. Now he has 2 cups of food in the morning and 2 cups in the evening. Furthermore while malamutes are younger, you shouldn’t allow them to jump over anything that is the same height or higher than their shoulders to prevent hip complications since they are more susceptible to hip dysplasia.

Malamutes need exercise. A lot of what I read said Malamutes are energetic and need exercise to the extent that they need work to do – whether it be running, hiking, walking or playing with you or other dogs. An exercised Malamute is a happy Malamute … and owner. That’s the truth. When Simba was younger, I left him while I was in class for 3 hours. When I returned, he’d chewed up the couch cushion and toilet paper is all over the floor. He now stays outside while I am away. Also getting a hike or an hour walk each day.20160722_181211

Malamutes are independent and at times stubborn. I constantly experienced this every single time we did dog training classes. Simba would only follow commands as long as it benefitted him. In other words, as long as you had food to give him.  So don’t be surprised or disappointed if your malamute doesn’t follow your every command. In many instances Simba still won’t come on command.

On hikes, due to being independent, he would wander off by himself for short periods of time. One time on a hike, when he was 4 or 5 months, he disappeared during a walk. I spent 20 minutes calling his name and walking back and forth on the trail. I was in full panic mode. I ended up calling my mother and brother to see if they could come and help me find him. Fortunately, my brother was walking his roommate’s dog in the same area and drove past my car. Sitting by the car was Simba. To say that I was relieved was an understatement.

Malamutes like many artic breeds, are extremely friendly. Therefore they don’t make the best guard dogs. They are more likely to invite an intruder in and ask them for pets. Simba displays this characteristic to a T. He is extremely friendly to everyone he encounters to an extent that he will occasionally jump on them. He doesn’t realize that most people don’t want an almost 100-pound dog in their face. Let’s just say he is still learning not to jump on people

All and all malamutes are  intelligent, energetic, independent breed that requires dedication to raise them.  But once you earn their respect they are a family member for life.20160723_082617

5 Life Lessons from Growing Up on a Ranch

I wouldn’t trade growing up dirty and wild on a ranch in the middle of nowhere for anything in the world. Every day was an adventure. I figured it’s time I share a few lessons I learned along the way.

#1: Always close the gate behind you.

This may seem like a little thing, or it may seem unimportant to the regular city-raised person, but this is one of the most important things I’ve learned to date. You never know when the cows will get turned out, and most of the time you won’t have time to check the gates across the pasture—you’ll just trust that they were closed. In life, closing the gate behind you has a little bit of a different meaning. Don’t let the past sneak up on you. Your past may contain hurt, sadness, anger, or words that sting like a snake bite. It’s important to close the gate. Don’t let the negative aspects of your past effect the endless possibilities of your future. Always close the gate.

#2: Never trust the roosters.

To some, roosters look interesting and some of them can even appear attractive the average city-raised person. To a ranch kid, roosters look like the devil himself trotting around with crooked feathers and a razor-sharp beak with rough talons to match. Never turn your back or trust for one second that the rooster(s) won’t launch a sneak attack. The same can be applied to life. Some people may look inviting and maybe even interesting, but it’s important to keep your distance. Trusting everyone you meet can lead to broken hearts and tear-stained pillows. Although people don’t have crooked feathers, razor-sharp beaks and nasty talons, they can have crooked intentions, razor-sharp tongues, and rough eyes—used only to judge those around them. Never trust the roosters.

#3: Moving sprinkler pipe sucks.

If you grew up with a dad like mine, you were up at 5:00am; before the sun broke over the purple mountains. The air would be crisp…too crisp. The water would be cold…actually, make that one degree away from freezing. The pipe would be heavy…full of the almost frozen water and the occasional mouse, snake, or gopher. The field would be big…and seem to get bigger as you make your way across with the air stinging at your nose, the cold water dripping down your arm and making its way into your jacket, and the pipe slowly getting heavier. OKAY, so maybe it wasn’t this bad. But, getting drug out of your warm bed at 5:00am everyday sucked. However, watching the sun peak over the mountains, hearing nothing but your footsteps through the crop and the occasional coyote yelping and yipping was pure heaven. Watching the crop grow each day always made me crack a smile. Watching the swather cut down your hours of hard work was bittersweet, but being able to feed your horses a couple flakes of hay off of your field—knowing you worked through the cold, wet, heavy, adventurous mornings was a feeling like no other. Always remember to move through the unpleasant to be rewarded in the end. Moving sprinkler pipe sucks.

#4: Dying is a part of living.

Although most are afraid of death, growing up on a ranch teaches you at an early age to view death as a part of living. Losing crops, animals, or loved ones never gets easier, but it does start to become less shocking. Moxy, Friday, Kitty, Maggie, Daisy, Mario, Luigi, Oreo, Theodore, Stereo, Wilson, Bob, Blake, Wyatt, Star, Julie, and Steiner is just a partial list of the animals and people I’ve watched get to wherever they’re going over the years. Nothing about losing them was easy, and nothing about losing them made sense. You’ll become familiar with death, and maybe even start to accept it. When I was little my uncle told me, “Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather skid in sideways, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-‘Holy shit! What a ride!'” Dying is a part of living.

#5: Keep yourself company.

Most of the time you’ll be building fence, fixing fence, riding horses, filling tanks, or feeding by yourself. This time is important. You’ll learn that being alone doesn’t mean you have to be lonely. You’ll hear the birds calling, horses snorting, water flowing, and grasshoppers chirping. Cows are good listeners. They stare, and they’re dumber than a box of rocks, but they’ll listen to you practice public speaking or singing or even just talking about your day. When the sun starts to go down and you start to slowly make your way home, remember to keep yourself company.

10 Reason Every Man In His Early Twenties Should Own A Dog

I got my dog, Brook Trout, four months ago and my life has not been the same since. Over the past four months I’ve learned what it means to be solely responsible for another life. In your early twenties you have a lot going on between class, work, relationships, and trying to figure out what to do with your life. It might not seem like the best time to get a dog, but if you’re ready to take on the challenge it will be one of the most rewarding experiences of your life. I’ve put together a list of 10 reasons every man in his early twenties should get a dog, as long as  he is up for the challenge.

10 Reasons Every Man In His Early Twenties Should Own A Dog…
btmirror

  1. It will help you learn how to balance your responsibilities. When you’re in your early twenties you want to just lean your head out the window and enjoy the scenery, but you have to buckle down and get ready for the rest of your life. btclarkfork
  2. It will help keep you active. No matter how busy you are you have to find time to get out and exercise with your dog, whether it is a short walk around the neighborhood or a long afternoon hike, your dog will get you outside. btriver
  3. You will always have a companion that will love you unconditionally no matter what. After you graduate you will have friends come and go, but your dog will always be there when you need a best friend. brookcoorslight
  4. You always have a drinking buddy. Whether it’s a beer when you get home from work or a beer on the river, your dog will always be there to keep you company while you enjoy a silver bullet. btyeti5. There will always be an extra set of eyes on your cooler; more importantly the contents of your cooler. btfishing6. You’ll always have a fishing buddy. When you’re itching to go fishing, but none of your friends are your dog will be more than ready to hit the river with you!
    btzootown7. It will give you a different view of the world. As long as your dog has enough food, enough water, a place to sleep at night, and someone to love they are happy and healthy. This is perhaps the most important lesson you can learn from having a dog. btfood8. You’ll always have a reason to laugh. No matter how stressed out you are your dog will always be there doing goofy things to put a smile on your face. btbitterroot9. Your dog will always be looking out for you. Whether it is a stranger approaching you or a bear approaching you, your dog will always alert you when things aren’t quite right. img_309810. GIRLS. I have yet to meet a girl that can resist a cute puppy. I am always approached by girls when I take Brook out for a walk in busy places, specifically around campus. My single guy friends are always asking me if they can take Brook for a walk, they play it off like they’re trying to help me out, but we all know they’re just using Brook to pick up girls.

If you would like to see more pictures of Brook Trout you can check her out on my Instagram @Jared_Denni! Thank you! – Jared Denniston

 

5 of the Best Horse Videos Ever

This compilation of horses and their riders is simply to make you smile. Kids, buck-offs, a lack of common sense, and a moon walking pony. Enjoy!

  1. When you’ve got short legs and a tall horse, you have to get creative when getting on!

2. When raising awareness for a worthy cause such as the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, you might want to make sure your horse is on board first!

3. Sometimes it is easy to forget how intimidating a horse can be to newcomers. This poor guy never had a chance.

4. This little girl and her horse cinnamon are the cutest pair you will ever see!

5. This one is obviously not real but is still quite funny. I think we’ve all met a pony that we believe is secretly like this!