How To Thrive As A Single Parent Student

To start, remember that you have got this! You are starting an adventure that will have lasting impacts on you and your family, regardless of your starting support network size.  You can do this.

Here are a few tips to make the transition a little less stressful as you go back to school:

Start Building a Support Network

The more support you have through your college experience, even if it is just for yourself, the better it will be in the long run for you and your kids. We’ll talk about some support network ideas for the kids in just a moment.

Begin in your school’s student success center. In the business school, they have been a great resource for me. They have assisted me with my resume and they have been an encouragement for so much of the hard steps.

They even made a way for me to have access to career fairs that would have been difficult to attend with my daughter.  The first semester of the evening career fair, they even offered to watch her! The second semester, they asked a MISA (Management Information Student Association) member to watch children for the event. That is an amazing resource!  They have been incredibly good to me. They would not have known my need, however if I had not taken the first step to meet with them.

Meet with your Professors

I cannot stress enough how vital this is. Your professors want you to succeed and want to help you!

Every professor in and out of my major has been wonderful. I do feel like I was incredibly blessed haven chosen the MIS degree path. My professors have supported, encouraged, given hard advice, and pushed me to be the best I could be and not limit myself because of the fact that I am a single mom and a non-traditional student. I have signed a contract for an amazing career, before I graduate, because of my professors.

They did things that made it easier for me to succeed. For example, I brought my daughter to class on the days when she was out of school in the middle of the week.

Here is the truth though, I emailed or talked to my professors to make sure it was okay to bring her with me.  I never wanted them to think I took it for granted and I wanted them to have an option to say no. They have never not allowed me to bring her with me. Every time I have needed to bring my daughter, all of my professors have been gracious towards me and her.

Do Not Limit Yourself to Just Your College

Ask about resources that will help you succeed in your learning and then follow up and utilize them.  Need help with writing? Go to the writing center. If you have a kid that is young enough to go to ASUM childcare, utilize that resource. If you need help with almost any high fail rate class, there is a study jam or tutoring to be found in the evenings or in the Lomasson building.

The generosity of faculty, staff and other students,  was one of the things that most surprised me in this experience as a non-traditional single parent student.

Photo by Laurent Peignault on Unsplash

Support For Your Child

How Do You Balance Homework And Parenting?

My daughter was 8-years-old when I began school, so we were able to have conversations about what it was like to be in college from the start. We do a lot of talking through her feelings when it gets hard and she feels like she is not getting the level of attention that she needs. I try to be as validating as possible about how challenging it can be for her, too.

We make compromises as well. So, for example, I will set a timer for ten minutes and I will stop working on homework once that goes off just to be present with her. I will sometimes set another timer to know when to get back to my assignments.

 How Do You Handle Out Of School Days While Still Having Class?

I typically take my daughter with me. She gets screen time during the classes, which is a treat for her. Plus, I let her know that I am excited that she gets to attend class with me. Like I said before, my professors have been very kind to her and I have also found that other students make her feel welcome to be in the class.

Another option, here in Missoula, are drop-in daycare centers. The one that I will use on occasion is very loving and my daughter feels safe there.

How Do You Handle Your Child Being Sick?

The university does not have a great solution for sick kids.  However,  after growing my friend base and support group, I have found that there are some faculty, staff and other students are willing to help me and not just from my own college.  I have also found that my professors have been very understanding through the process of having a sick child.  So seriously, talk to your professors!

Conclusion

The building of a support network is very important to your success as a student. I believe that if you are willing to put yourself out there and be friendly, you will be able to have the support group that you need.  I have found that the University of Montana’s faculty, staff and students are an incredible group of people that, on the whole, want to be in your corner as you pursue your educational goals!

Photo by guille pozzi on Unsplash

 

 

Mandy Fischer is a single parent to an amazing 10-year-old daughter. She will be graduating the Spring of 2020 from the University of Montana with a Business Management Information Systems degree. She recently accepted a position with Deloitte that begins after graduation and is excited for the future!

A Weekend Guide to Whitefish, Montana in Winter

Wintertime in Whitefish, Montana is one of the most beautiful seasons to enjoy the small ski town and all it has to offer. This town doesn’t slow down after a winter storm, it celebrates it! Are you thinking about exploring this hidden gem for a weekend getaway? This article will give you the perfect weekend itinerary for what to see and do while you’re here.

Saturday

8:30 am – Breakfast at Buffalo Cafe

A local favorite, Buffalo Cafe offers amazing breakfast options to keep you energized for your full day ahead!

10:00 am – Ski on Big Mountain

A trip to Whitefish is never complete without a day at Whitefish Mountain Resort. Endless slopes and an approachable mountain offers a day of fun for all level of skiers and snowboarders.

3:00 pm – Apres Ski at Hellroaring Saloon

After hittin’ the slopes, enjoy an apres-ski drink and nachos at Hellroaring Saloon, located next to the village on the mountain.

5:00 pm – Massage at the Spa at Whitefish Lake

You’re bound to be sore after a day on the mountain, so treat yourself to a massage at the beautiful Spa at Whitefish Lake!

7:00 pm – Dinner at Tupelo Grille

Be sure to book a table here, and be ready for one of the best meals in town. Featuring local cuisine influenced by cajun and southern flavors, the superb service completes a meal here.

Sunday

8:30 am – Breakfast at Loula’s Cafe

Loula’s breakfasts include the standard fare as well as popular originals like Lemon Stuffed French toast with raspberry sauce or Eggs Benedict with white truffle oil.

9:45 am – Pick up a Packed Lunch from Montana Coffee Traders

Before you head off for the day, pick up a packed lunch from Montana Coffee Traders. They offer a variety of sandwiches and snacks that you can bring with you to the park which is helpful because most restaurants in West Glacier are closed in the winter!

10:00 am – Drive to Glacier National Park to snowshoe

The beautiful Glacier National Park is only a 30-minute drive away from Whitefish and offers miles of scenic snowshoeing trails.  You can rent snowshoes from multiple places in town as well as outside of the park.

7:00 pm – Dinner at Abruzzo’s

Finish off your day with a delicious traditional Italian meal at Abruzzo’s. They offer extensive selection of shared plates, grilled steaks, fresh seafood, and a small but decadent dessert list, all prepared in-house and served alongside an Italian-focused cocktail program and an Italian-centric wine list.

 

 

 

 

My Favorite Places Along The Oregon Trail

If you went to school in the 80’s or 90’s you probably played the computer game The Oregon Trail.  While on your exciting and fateful journey you learned about dysentery and getting run over by a wagon.  Luckily, on this journey you have very little chance of those things happening.  However, there is a high chance you will learn about our ancestors and have a bit of fun.  So let’s get started…

We’re going to begin our journey west in Independence, Missouri.  All of the historic trails—Oregon, Santa Fe, and California, started at or near Independence.  This was a popular “jumping off” point where the pioneers

could stock their wagons before their arduous journey.  Spend some time getting acquainted with the trail at the National Frontier Trails Museum. This museum researches, interprets, and preserves the history of the pioneers who traveled along the trials.  After seeing the museum head to the Independence Courthouse Square, this was the official start of The Oregon Trail.  Walk around the square and try and get a sense of what it was like to have all of your earthly possessions crammed into a wagon to set off on a dangerous journey across the continent.

Make your way west to Rock Creek Station which is near Fairbury, Nebraska.  Rock Creek Station was a Pony Express station and road ranch that served the

pioneers along the trail.  It is here where Wild Bill Hickok shot his first man.  You can see reconstructed buildings, pioneer graves and trail ruts.  While in the area you should definitely check out the wonderful Homestead National Monument in Beatrice, Nebraska.

Keep heading west to Kearney and The Great Platte River Road Archway, one of the coolest spots along the trail.  The monument is a museum that honors the people who followed the historic trails and built America.

After visiting The Archway head to the south side of the interstate to visit Ft. Kearney.  This was an important outpost along the trail, it allowed the pioneers to resupply and offered them a safe resting area in a sometimes harsh territory.

 

Continue on brave pioneer, you’re 15% finished with your journey!

 

We are next headed to the Scottsbluff area and there is A LOT to see here so make sure you have some snacks.  This would also be a great area to make your home base for a few days.  The first landmark you can see from a distance is Courthouse and Jail Rocks.

These are the first rock formations that the pioneers would have seen on their journey west.  At one time there was also a Pony Express station located here.

 

 

Just a mere fifteen miles further west stands Chimney Rock.

One of the most awe inspiring and famous landmarks along the trail, Chimney Rock rises over 300 feet above the valley.  Do you have some quarters in your pocket?  If one is a Nebraska state quarter then you will see a wagon in front of this majestic landmark.  While you’re here make sure to check out the pioneer cemetery.

After Chimney Rock head over to see the fabulous landmark Scotts Bluff National Monument.  Scotts Bluff encompasses over 3,000 acres and towers 800 feet over the valley.

Visitors to the monument can walk in the footsteps of the pioneers of the Oregon Trail, drive to the top of the bluff via the Summit Road and stand in awe at the sight of the bluffs rising up from the prairie.

Before you leave Scotts Bluff pay your respects to an Oregon Trail pioneer, Rebecca Winters. Her grave lies on the eastern side of the town of Scottsbluff at the corner of South Beltline Highway and US Highway 26.  Rebecca died in 1852 after contracting cholera, a friend chiseled her name on an iron wagon tire which still stands on her grave today.

Keep heading west, pioneer, to Ft. Laramie.  You’ve made it to Wyoming! You’re a quarter of the way there! The fort was constructed in the 1830’s to support the fur trade and it soon became the largest and most important fort on the frontier.  Travelers would stop here for several days to rest, mail letters home, and resupply.  Today you can stroll the grounds and visit some of the many restored buildings and ruins.

Just down the road a bit from Ft Laramie is the town of Guernsey where you can see Register Cliff and the Guernsey Trail Ruts.  Register Cliff contains the engravings of hundreds of trail pioneers in the soft sandstone.  Register Cliff, along with Independence Rock and Names Hill, is one of three prominent “recording areas” in Wyoming.

The Guernsey Trail Ruts, or the Oregon Trail Ruts State Historic  Site, is an amazing section of preserved trail ruts.  Decades of pioneers, wagons, and animals wore down the sandstone two to six feet.  Take some time and walk in the ruts.

Next on our journey is the town of Casper, Wyoming.  This would be an excellent place to rest for a couple of days.  While you are here make sure to visit the National Historic Trails Interpretive Center. This museum showcases the several different trails with artifacts and interactive displays.

 

Just a few miles away is Ft Caspar, this is a military post that was named for Caspar Collins who was killed during the Battle of Platte Bridge Station.  Yes, Caspar really spelled his name that way.

 

 

Independence Rock, which lies about an hour southwest of Casper, is a large, rounded monolith that is known as the “register of the desert.”  The rock was a major landmark for the pioneers, they needed to make it here by July 4th to ensure they made it across the Rocky Mountains.  If you walk all the way around the rock you’ve walked about a mile.  Also try and climb to top so you can see the many pioneer inscriptions.

Head west on Highway 287 and south on Highway 28 you’ll see some of the most gorgeous Wyoming landscapes, you’ll be traveling through what’s called South Pass.  This is also the half way point of the journey west. Hopefully, you’ll get to witness the graceful antelopes bounce through the sage.  Make sure to stop at some of the roadside pull offs where you experience both the past and present.

Next you’ll want to make your way over to Montpelier, Idaho and visit the National Oregon/California Trail Center.  This is a living-history center, which sits directly on the site of the historic Clover Creek Encampment on the Oregon Trail.  The center contains displays and artifacts and depicts the pioneers’ journey along the trail.

Fort Hall is just a short drive from Montpelier but it would have taken the pioneers several days to get there.  The fort was originally used as a fur trading post but soon became a major resupply center for the pioneers.  They had been traveling for weeks since a resupply and hundreds of thousands of immigrants made use of Fort Hall.

Keep cruising along, pioneer, we are almost there!

Just west on I84 is Three Island Crossing.  This was a major point for the pioneers.  It was here where they had to decide on whether or not to cross the dangerous Snake River.  If you remember from the Oregon Trail game many pioneers never made it across.

The last stop on this Oregon Trail journey is the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center in Baker City, Oregon.  Yes, you made it to Oregon!  This 500 acre site features original Oregon Trail ruts.  The center also features dioramas, artifacts, and theater presentations.

Well, pioneers, you’ve made it to Oregon!  Hopefully, no one drowned, died of dysentery, or got bit by any snakes.  There are many more amazing places to see along the trail, hopefully you’ll be inspired to go on your own manifest destiny across the plains, prairies, and mountains of the west.

 

 

First, a Daily Dose of Doggies

Some days feel like this:
Or this:

So take a moment to cheer up with these

and remember this:

____        ____        ____         ____

Whoever chose the performers at the 2020 halftime and decided what they did on stage was brilliant. Because the watchers who are silent–silent about what the show imitates of the horror being forced upon children and families in America–silent about the lack of human rights–silent about the memo that having a voice that is powerful enough together to create change–are being heard. People are showing the silent people that their lack of certain values is most definitely not welcome. Anger is–and should continue–being thrown at the silent because they outcry about exposed skin instead of about the inhumane treatment of people in America.

You can say that shouting on social media doesn’t make much of an impact. But it can be the start of an impact. Fan the flame of this shouted conversation that has been taking place since the beginning of injustice–the halftime show did. (Leo DiCaprio did it for the conversation on climate change when he won an Oscar. Emma Watson does it for gender equality). Many other people use their fame or events to fuel conversation and create change. Many more not famous people create a platform and change daily.

Anyone can see at a glance online whose values align (or don’t) with theirs. This creates a supportive network. Fueling the fire every now and then keeps this communication in place. And who knows what can be done with this network–what actions can spark, then–ignite.

Written by S. Ward for NPAD 460: Marketing and Social Media, Spring 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Reasons Why You Need to Ride in Montana

You know how everyone from Montana says “Montana’s the last, best place”? Well they also say “Montana’s the last best place to go horseback riding”.

Conway Tweetie glancing at wild flowers

Here are the reasons why you need to mark “a horse back ride in MT” off your bucket list.

1. The connection that you feel between the horse and the wild Montana landscape, it feels like it all becomes one.

2. You have the one in a million chance to feel the freshness of all four seasons in a single ride.

3. Sun- gaze at the big sky filled with blue and cotton ball clouds that are above you.

Montana Sunset

4. Riding in MT will increase your love for life while peeking over the breath taking scenery.

 

5. As the great Dixie Chicks would say the “Wide Open Spaces” makes MT irresistible.

Rio Warbar grazing fresh green grass

“Don’t get so busy making a living that you forget to make a life” -Dolly Parton

By Desiree Altmaier