Camping Without the Crowds

By: Breanna Harmer

Choosing the correct time of year is crucial.

Think a little outside of peak season when camping.

I’m personally a fan of mid-May and September.

Two Medicine, Glacier National Park in September

Consider backpacking. Yes, it is a bit more work but it is also 100% worth it.

Waking up to a backcountry sunrise is an unbeatable feeling.

I would highly recommend the Grand Tetons in August, especially if you’re a fan of wildflowers. It is still chilly so pack your warm gear!

Get your backcountry permit early! It is surprising how quickly these go and there are limited sites. If you’re unlucky and don’t get a permit you might be forced to find a different hike or abandon your backcountry plans altogether.

Check out apps like AllTrails

We went backpacking in the Mission Mountain Wilderness on the 4th of July and it was one of the best ideas we’ve had. There weren’t many people, the weather was perfect, and we were away from the National Park chaos.

Holidays like Memorial Day, 4th of July and Labor Day are major camping holidays. Opt-out of the beer and think whiskey and backpacking. Look for trails that are more under the radar. There might be some like-minded people like you on the trail but far less then if you were to try to claim your stake on Seeley Lake or Flathead.

Be flexible! If a site seems too busy, don’t be afraid to look for a different one. Some of my favorite camping sites have been found after leaving a less exciting one behind.

Checking a map for a water source is a good way of finding a good site. Chances are that if it’s near a river or lake that it’ll come with a view as well.

Avoid geotagging on social media. If you like a site because there weren’t many people there, don’t expose it.

This might be controversial but I really do believe every little bit helps in preserving the things we love. It’s one thing to tell a few friends but if you have 1,000 followers on Instagram, you could possibly be telling around 1,000 people about this newfound gem. Mum’s the word

Don’t worry, he wasn’t caught. Just an expert fence climber!

I also think part of the joy of camping comes from discovering new spots on your own. It has become too easy to look everything up, it’ll mean more to you if you find it yourself.

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10 MUST HAVE stops on a PNW road trip!! Secret spots straight from locals!

4 girls set out on college budgets to see the Pacific North West, stops are listed in the video along with videos of the beautiful scenery!

by Teresa Zortman

Start: Sacramento, California

We then stayed in the Redwoods in Arcata, California. After one night, we woke up the next morning and got on Highway 101.

We then camped in Lincoln County on the coast of Oregon. The campsite was nice- but crowded. We usually back-pack to our campsites so this was a change.

Then we did another big haul up the 101, this was a big driving day but we took many impulsive stops to break it up. We arrived in Seattle in time to eat an over-priced lunch!

We spent some major time exploring the city, surprisingly one of our favorite parts was not the space needle but the wheel on the Seattle Waterfront!

Next was Canada- the border crossing. It took us about an hour to get over the border, even though we tried crossing late at night.

We woke up to a sunny, bright day in the land of maple syrup. We stayed in Burnaby, just outside of Vancouver. We had breakfast, biked, and went to Granville Island! (I rode a tandem bike, and wore a fanny pack. Representing America well to our Northern neighbors.

Sadly, we could not stay in Canada. So we drove down back into Washington where we conquered Mount Baker and tested the speeds of the Ford Fiesta that we had all crammed into.

Our final stop was Portland. We got followed by homeless men cat-calling us but other than that it was great!

The original plan was to camp one more time at a remote site by a River South of Grants Pass, but an epic rain/thunder storm killed those plans. So we settled for a Dutch Bros stop.

I would HIGHLY recommend this trip and these stops! I wish we could’ve taken a longer trip than 10 days.

Road Trip to Hot Springs

On a cold winter weekend some people prefer shredding the mountains, others enjoy a cold beer in a 100 degree natural hot spring pool. The beautiful drive along Highway 12 is a huge perk, especially when you’re the only one on it!

The video was shot on my Canon 5D Mark III with a 35mm f1.4 lens.

Thanks for watching!