6 Best Ski Resort Near Missoula…

There are a ton of options for skiing within the western part of Montana, whether this be in our beloved home state, or one of our close neighbors. There is plenty of fresh powder to go around…

To Start off this list we are going to lay down a few guidelines. All of these ski resorts are within 200 miles of Missoula, and for those of you that were worried…They all sell beer as well.

  1. The Montana Snowbowl  (15 miles outside town)                                                    Snowbowl will always a special place in the hearts of Missoulians, for its close proximity to town, and your ability to go from class to the slopes in under 20 minutes.  While Snowbowl may have its ups and downs, you can always count on good skiing when they get some fresh snow up in the bowls. Priced at $48 for a student day pass, it’s not going to break the bank too bad. But they make up for it with $4 beers in the lodge at the base
  2. Lookout Pass Ski & Recreation Area (105 miles outside town)

Lookout pass ski area is known as the #1 Powder Place, and they definitely live up to that name. Lookout gets the most fresh snow out of all the resorts near Missoula, and for the most part, has pretty good weather. This resort is about an hour and 45 minutes from campus and never gets too crazy so you’ll always have a parking spot. A student day pass for Lookout will run you about $46, but the snow makes it worth it!

3. Discovery Ski Area (91 miles outside town)

Discovery ski area is located about an hour and a half from Missoula and will never let you down. With a really good mix of steep groomers and powder-filled trees, this resort is perfect for everyone. For those seeking a thrill, Discovery has an expert only backside of the mountain with some truly crazy runs. The only downfall of this resort is the road up to the lodge can get pretty bad, but you’ll always be able to find a ride up from the bottom. Discovery will run you about $50 for a day pass, but you’ll be able to go on a different run every time all day.

4. Lost Trail Powder Mountain (75 miles outside town)

Lost trail is another favorite among locals, for its close proximity to town and amazing snow. You can almost always count on fresh snow at lost trail, and when the Montana side is open it is absolutely mind-blowing. This resort is never too crazy, and it also has a hot spring just down the road for an after skiing relaxation break. A day pass will run you about $45 and you’ll be able to get food and beer at the base lodge for a pretty reasonable price.

5. Whitefish Mountain Resort (140 miles outside town)

Still known to many locals as “Big Mountain” because of the name change back in 2007, but none the less this mountain is absolutely insane. The most powder you can find in western Montana and offers some of the most diverse terrains. Even though this resort is pretty far from Missoula, it makes up for it with the beautiful views and the chance to go on an inversion day. A day pass will run you about $83 and that’s pretty steep for most college students, but a trick it to go buy 2 day passes for $120 from Costco.

6. Blacktail Mountain Ski Area (120 miles outside town)

Blacktail is known for having some serious terrain, with steep faces and ungroomed runs all over the mountain. This resort gets a good amount of powder and can definitely prove to be tough in some spots. With its close proximity to Whitefish, the resort is pretty easily accessible and doesn’t break the bank at $45 for a day pass.

What I From Learned Driving in the Snow

Caroline Armstrong

Being raised in Seattle, Washington I did not get many opportunities to drive in the snow growing up. When it did snow, usually only 1-2 inches, everything shut down and people just simply stayed home – no need to drive! With the current snow storm hitting the Seattle area, I though I would share the valuable lesson I learned in 2015.

After high school I decided to go to college in Montana, and as most people know it snows quite a bit in Montana. My first year of college, I decided to drive back to Seattle for Thanksgiving with a few of my friends. It had just begun snowing the day before and I had a 4-wheel drive car so I figured everything should be OK.

I began my drive down I-90 West with a car full of gals, the snow was light and everything was going fine… well, for about 50 miles at least.

Coming around a slight curve at about 60 MPH (the Montana speed limit is 80 MPH) I felt my back tires starting to slide and just like that I had lost all control. My car spun around 3 or 4 times before slamming into a ditch and screeching to a stop. Shock. That’s all I felt. Silence. No one had said a word the whole time we were spinning and crashing. Immediately we all got out of the car to make sure everyone was OK and to examine the damage.

The airbags had deployed, I had a broken front axle, completely messed up front and back bumpers, two popped tires and two bent rims. But most importantly, no one was hurt. Luckily, my friends are much better at handling bad situations than I am because that is when it all set it. I could have killed myself and all my friends. Why? Because I was inexperienced. I didn’t know to slow down. I didn’t know to be on the lookout for black ice – what ended by causing the accident. I just didn’t know.

Driving when there is snow and ice on the road is unlike any other driving condition. Yes, you might have 4-wheel drive but that does not mean you have 4-wheel stop. The ice has a mind of its own and once you begin to slide it can be very hard to stop.

This winter, I beg of you to go slow in the snow. If you are an experienced snow driver, slow down. If you have never driven in the snow before, slow down. Even if the roads seem fine, slow down. It could save your life.

6 Most Important Items for Your Car this Winter

Car in winter

The first snow and cold spell have invaded our lives and added that extra few steps to our daily routine. With winter now upon us it is time to be prepared. Is your car ready for winter and its many curve balls (snowballs that is)? Here are the must haves for your car so you can survive this winter!!!

Ice Scraper:

First and foremost, do you have your ice scraper handy and dug out from under the back seat? Like most of you I to hide it through the summer months. This is a necessary item for the upcoming events of the winter.

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You can also use and old CD case (who has these) or credit card if you are in a pinch to scrape your windows.

 

Tow rope:

I know this may seem like overkill, I mean come on I’m a Montanan and know how to drive in snowy conditions, please look at my pick up its made for this. Well, this is especially important for you folks. Throw that tow rope in, you never know when you may have to just move that person stuck in front of you out of the way so you can get to your destination.

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Jumper cables:

In the winter months comes the winter cold as well and our batteries just love the cold. For those that can’t sense my sarcasm, it would be an experience driven recommendation I make to you. Make sure you have some jumper cables and know where your battery is located in your car. Additionally, it would be wise that if you are parking your car in extreme cold or for an extend period of time that you park strategically so that you can jump your car easily if needed.
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Spare gloves and hat:

Yea, I know you already have them on but the point of this is to be prepared for the unexpected. Grabbing hold of your steering wheel first thing in the morning when it’s below freezing isn’t like wrapping your hands around a frosty beverage after a day in the sun. Throw that spare pair of glove and a cap in your car you will thank me later.

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Extra washer fluid:

This is for that beautiful day the sun is out and the streets get slushy. Yuck, right? Your car ends up filthy and you run your wipers thinking you have washer fluid, and whoops you have a smeared mess. Should have woken up sooner all week and warmed your vehicle instead of using washer fluid to speed up melting the ice!

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Shovel:

Who wants a shovel handy that means work? Instead of being stranded have a shovel handy to dig your way out of you get stuck or at least to clear a path to the passenger side for your significant other (happy wife happy life?).

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I hope your winter months are flawless and full of ease, but in case the harsh winter has other plans at least you will be prepared.